“Annuities may create too much income,” by Cassandra Jones, The Record-Courier

“One of the questions I regularly get is whether a person is automatically disqualified from Medicaid if he or her income is too high. The short answer is no. . . . As a practitioner in elder law, one of the biggest areas of concern I have is the over use of annuities to provide for the care of an individual. Done wrong, the asset you just converted to an annuity may cause an individual to have too much income if the applicant needs to apply for government benefits. It may ultimately result in someone converting retirement assets into a
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

“IRS announces bump in 2018 HSA limits,” by Kathryn Mayer, Employee Benefit News

“The annual limit on deductible contributions to a health savings account will jump by $50 in calendar year 2018 for individuals and $150 for families, according to the IRS. For 2018, the annual contribution limitation for a person with self-only coverage under a high-deductible health plan is $3,450, up from $3,400 in calendar year 2017, the IRS announced last week. The annual limit on deductible contributions for a person with family coverage under a high-deductible health plan will be $6,900 in 2018, up from $6,750 in 2017.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): HSAs
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

Options for Paying LTC Costs

There’s a real good chance that, at some point in their lifetime, an individual will need long-term care services costing them as much as $8,000 per month. How could you help prepare your clients for this anticipated expense? In his recent Kiplinger  article entitled, “Don’t Let Long-Term Care Costs Devastate Your Retirement“, Jared E. Elson, an investment adviser, provides various options you might consider when helping your clients tackle this pricey problem. Don’t Let Long-Term Care Costs Devastate Your Retirement Article and information brought to us by United Security Assurance.   #goldencareagent #unitedsecurity #longtermcare
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Categories: Industry News and United Security.

“Getting lost could be the first sign of Alzheimer’s, finds new study,” by Rachael Revesz, Independent

“Getting lost, even if you are in a familiar location, could be one of the first signs of Alzheimer’s, scientists have discovered. A new study from Edinburgh University called the Prevent project, which involves other UK research centres, aims to discover the first symptoms of the disease in people when they are still young. . . . Scientists claim . . . that medication is more potent if used on patients during the earlier stages of the disease, and that a healthy lifestyle can also prevent its potential development.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

“Profile: Christopher Perna,” by Elizabeth Leis Newman, McKnight’s Long Term Care News

“Perna spent 25 years in a successful career in the insurance industry in executive roles, including moving to Rochester, NY, in 1999 to head MedAmerica. . . . Moving to Eden came after a hiatus from the insurance industry, Perna says, when he wasn’t sure what he wanted to do next. After having a conversation with Eden Alternative founder Bill Thomas, M.D., Perna accepted the group’s role of president and CEO in 2010. Thomas says he knew Perna was right because ‘he was able to reconcile the competing demands of the head and the heart.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A.
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

“AHIP Sees 28% Increase in Medigap Enrollment Among Seniors,” by Jesse Migneault, HealthPayerIntelligence

“AHIP has released data showing that enrollment in the Medicare Supplement, Medigap, has seen a steady increase from 2014 to December 2015. The data represents statistics from 11.8 million enrollees with policies from 305 separate insurers. The steady increase is due to the standard deductible, and rising out-of-pocket costs for Medicare members, AHIP says.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): In a more rational economic world, government (welfare) would fill gaps in private insurance, not vice versa. But better this than an all government, single payer system. AHIP Sees 28% Increase in Medigap Enrollment
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Categories: Industry News and Medicare Supp./Adv..

“Gender gap in Alzheimer’s disease rates, caregiving needs more attention,” by Roberta Diaz Brinton, STAT

“Women make up nearly two-thirds of the more than 5 million Americans2 with Alzheimer’s disease. A woman in her 60s is now about twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s as breast cancer during her lifetime. And as described in a Viewpoint article3 published this week in JAMA Neurology, women shoulder the majority of caregiving for those with dementia. In fact, two and a half times2 as many women as men reported living full time with a person with dementia. . . . The link between differences in sex biology and Alzheimer’s is complex, and likely a product of the interplay between the
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

“Medicare Advantage beneficiaries less likely to use post-acute care, analysis finds,” by Emily Mongan, McKnight’s LTC News

“More Medicare Advantage beneficiaries are being discharged from the hospital directly to their homes, instead of to a post-acute care facility, than traditional fee-for-service patients, according to a new analysis from Avalere. The study found 77% of Medicare Advantage patients are sent home directly from the hospital, without home healthcare services or other forms of post-acute care. That’s compared to 63% of traditional Medicare beneficiaries.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): The article speculates MA incentivizes longer, better hospital care to obviate or reduce the need for post-acute care. Medicare Advantage beneficiaries less likely
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

“Thin People Not More Prone to Alzheimer’s, Study Finds,” by Mary Elizabeth Dallas, HealthDay

“A study of nearly 100,000 people overturns the notion that being thin somehow raises a person’s odds for Alzheimer’s disease.  Instead, the Danish research suggests, people with early stage Alzheimer’s disease can have less appetite and lose weight. So, it’s the illness that may be causing the thinness, not the other way around.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): Cause vs. correlation often confuses Alzheimer’s research conclusions. Thin People Not More Prone to Alzheimer’s, Study Finds #goldencareagent #alzheimer’s
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.

“In-home care of dementia patients falls mainly on women, researchers say,” MedicalXpress

“The responsibility of providing care to the vast number of patients with dementia expected over the next 20 years will disproportionately fall on working women, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.  ‘The best long-term care insurance in our country is a conscientious daughter,’ the authors wrote in a perspective piece to be published May 8 in JAMA Neurology. The article points to a lack of affordable in-home care options in the United States other than unpaid family members, primarily women.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): Why do we have
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Categories: Industry News and Long-Term Care.