“My incredible shrinking lifespan”

“My incredible shrinking lifespan,” by Gary Tetz, McKnight’s LTC News Quote: “With so much still to say to the long-term care profession, I’m realizing I better write fast, because I may not have many years left. Less all the time, according to a study from Oxford University.” LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform: Let LTC humorist Gary Tetz lighten your Friday mood. Then have a fine weekend.             Subscribe to GoldenCare News  
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Long-term care planning, retirement savings suffered during pandemic: study,” by Kimberly Bonvissuto”

“Long-term care planning, retirement savings suffered during pandemic: study,” by Kimberly Bonvissuto, McKnight’s Senior Living Quote: “More than half of Americans don’t have any plans in place for long-term care as they age, and many halted or reduced retirement savings contributions during the pandemic, according to the results of a new study. … Fifty-one percent of older adult respondents reported not having any long-term care plans in place, whereas 10% said they have arranged to live with a child or another close family member.” LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform: This level of denial may
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Most post-acute Medicare recipients with dementia sent to SNFs despite payment changes: study”

“Most post-acute Medicare recipients with dementia sent to SNFs despite payment changes: study,” by Alicia Lasek, McKnight’s LTC News Quote: “The investigators used Medicare data from 2013 to 2016 to compare SNF and home health use for post-acute care in these recipients over time. Their results revealed that one third (32%) of all fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who receive post-acute care have a dementia diagnosis. What’s more, 7 in 10 find this care in a skilled nursing facility. Overall use and trends were similar in the Medicare Advantage population. … The study was published this week in JAMDA.” LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses,
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Poorly controlled diabetes — not diabetes itself — triples dementia risk, study finds”

“Poorly controlled diabetes — not diabetes itself — triples dementia risk, study finds,” by Alicia Lasek, McKnight’s LTC News Quote: “The odds of developing full dementia among older adults with cognitive impairment triples when diabetes is poorly controlled — but diabetes itself is not a factor in progression, a new study has found.” LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform: An important distinction that underscores the importance of behavioral factors in avoiding dementia.             Subscribe to GoldenCare News  
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Washington state receives 95,000 exemption applications to new long-term care benefit in first week”

“Washington state receives 95,000 exemption applications to new long-term care benefit in first week,” by Alex Regimbal, Seattle PI Quote: “Between Oct. 1 and Oct. 8, the WA Cares Fund received roughly 95,000 exemption submissions, said Nick Demerice, the legislative affairs director for the state Employment Security Department. The first day workers could apply for an exemption was Oct. 1. The benefit is funded by a new payroll tax, which takes effect January 1, 2022. Nearly all Washington employees are subject to the tax, which is 0.58% of a worker’s total wages with no salary cap. That means an employee
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Nursing Facilities Need to Weather the ‘Reimbursement Storm”

“Nursing Facilities Need to Weather the ‘Reimbursement Storm’ of Medicare Advantage,” by Amy Stulick, Skilled Nursing News   Quote: “With Medicare Advantage revenue “significantly lower” than fee-for-service reimbursement, a new Zimmet Healthcare Services Group analysis says, skilled nursing facilities need to weather today’s “reimbursement storm” in order to make it to the incoming wave of baby boomers that will need facility services.”   LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform: Medicaid reimbursement rates were already less than the cost of providing the care. With Medicare Advantage in the mix there is another filter screening out revenue
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Medicaid’s safety net for pregnant women”

“Medicaid’s safety net for pregnant women,” by Bob Herman, Axios   Quote: “Fewer women are uninsured (10.5%) nationally than men (13.4%), due in large part to Medicaid providing pregnancy coverage for low-income women. By the numbers: 16.1% of women are on Medicaid, compared with 12.7% of men, according to census data analyzed by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Yes, but: Large swaths of the South still have restrictive Medicaid coverage or didn’t expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, leaving 1 in 5 women without insurance in states like Oklahoma and Texas. And while Medicaid pays for 43% of all births, that coverage can be short-lived
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Tallying the Cost of Growing Older”

“Tallying the Cost of Growing Older,” by Paula Span, New York Times   Quote: “Their results: Seventeen percent of 65-year-olds will need no long-term care. Almost one-quarter will develop severe needs, requiring many hours of help for more than three years. Most older people will fall between those poles, with 22 percent having only minimal needs. The largest group, 38 percent, can expect moderate needs — like support while they recover from a heart attack, after which they can again function independently. … The researchers calculated how much care retirees would need, how much they could receive from family and
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“10 Fastest-Rising Costs for Older Americans Since 2000”

“10 Fastest-Rising Costs for Older Americans Since 2000,” by Ginger Szala, ThinkAdvisor Quote: “Since 2000, Social Security benefits have lost 32% of their buying power despite yearly inflation adjustments, the group found in a new study. While COLAs have increased Social Security benefits 55% in that time, the typical older adult’s expenses have increased by 104.8%, according to the study.” LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform: Will Social Security always pay benefits? Yes. But you may not be able to afford anything with what it pays. This is how government entitlement programs wind down.        
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.

“Social Security Debt up $6.8T”

“Social Security Debt up $6.8T,” by John C. Goodman, Goodman Institute Quote: “The Social Security Trustees just released their annual report on the system’s finances. The news is awful. Most people know that the system’s future benefit promises are greater than its future payroll tax (FICA) revenues. But how big is the difference — its fiscal gap, also called its unfunded liability? The answer – a terrifying $59.8 trillion – is buried deep in Appendix table VIF1. That’s over 2.5 times the size of the U.S. economy. Even more disturbing is the change since last year’s report. The system’s debt grew by $6.8 trillion.” LTC Comment, Stephen A. Moses,
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Categories: Clippings and Industry News.