“Long-term care resident Medicare beneficiaries spend $22,384 out of pocket for healthcare annually: study”

“Long-term care resident Medicare beneficiaries spend $22,384 out of pocket for healthcare annually: study,” by Lois A. Bowers, McKnight’s Senior Living “Residents of long-term care facilities who have traditional Medicare coverage spent an average of $22,384 out of pocket for healthcare in 2016, the latest data available, according to a new analysis of Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services data by the Kaiser Family Foundation. In the study, ‘long-term care facility’ was defined to include assisted living, personal care facilities and retirement homes …. Eighty-eight percent of the out-of-pocket healthcare costs for long-term care residents, or $19,632, went toward the cost of long-term care
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“12% of Medicare Advantage Plans Will Offer Expanded Supplemental Benefits in 2020″

“12% of Medicare Advantage Plans Will Offer Expanded Supplemental Benefits in 2020,” by Robert Holly, Home Health Care News “The Medicare Advantage boom for home care is almost here. Ever since the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) first expanded the scope of Medicare Advantage (MA) supplemental benefits in April 2018, at-home care providers have been trying to figure out they fit into a potentially new reimbursement puzzle. … Overall, at least 364 plans will take advantage of CMS’s more flexible MA policies in 2020, according to the Milliman study, which was commissioned by the Washington, D.C.-based Better Medicare Alliance.
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“How Much Do Medicare Beneficiaries Spend Out of Pocket on Health Care?”

“How Much Do Medicare Beneficiaries Spend Out of Pocket on Health Care?,” by Juliette Cubanski, et al., Kaiser Family Foundation “In 2016, the average person with Medicare coverage spent $5,460 out of their own pocket for health care (Figure 1). This average includes spending by community residents and beneficiaries residing in long-term care facilities (5% of all beneficiaries in traditional Medicare). Among community residents alone, average out-of-pocket spending on premiums and health care services was $4,519 in 2016. But some groups of beneficiaries spent substantially more than others. Current Medicare-for-all proposals in Congress and from presidential candidates would largely eliminate out-of-pocket costs
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“Wearable activity trackers a reliable tool for predicting death risk in older adults”

“Wearable activity trackers a reliable tool for predicting death risk in older adults,” MedicalXPress “A federally funded study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers shows that wearable accelerometers—mechanical sensors worn like a watch, belt or bracelet to track movement—are a more reliable measure of physical activity and better than patient surveys and other methods used by physicians at assessing five-year risk of death in older adults.”   LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): No wonder Google bought Fitbit: more searchers longer.
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“What Retirement? People Over 65 Are Launching Encore Careers and Finding Fulfillment Like Never Before”

“What Retirement? People Over 65 Are Launching Encore Careers and Finding Fulfillment Like Never Before,” by Alix Langone, CNN Money “A growing number of older Americans are challenging the idea of traditional retirement, as more retirees decide they want to keep working or pursue passions after leaving the rat race behind: the number of Americans age 65 and over who continue to work has doubled since 1985, according to a study by United Income. Some people simply need to keep a paycheck coming in to cover the bills, but many want some combination of rewarding work on their own terms
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“CDC: U.S. life expectancy rises slightly, mortality rates fall compared to ’07″

“CDC: U.S. life expectancy rises slightly, mortality rates fall compared to ’07,” by Alicia Lasek, McKnight’s LTC News “Long-Term Care Planning Is Still a Great Way to Connect With Clients: Kristi Rodriguez,” by Allison Bell, ThinkAdvisor “United States life expectancy has increased slightly and mortality rates are down compared to 2007 numbers, while nursing homes are the third-most-used long-term care service, according to new data released this week by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Life expectancy rose to 78.6 years in 2017 – up 0.5 years from 2007, reported the agency’s National Center for Health Statistics. In
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“Long-Term Care Planning Is Still a Great Way to Connect With Clients: Kristi Rodriguez”

“Long-Term Care Planning Is Still a Great Way to Connect With Clients: Kristi Rodriguez,” by Allison Bell, ThinkAdvisor “Long-Term Care Planning Is Still a Great Way to Connect With Clients: Kristi Rodriguez,” by Allison Bell, ThinkAdvisor Quote: “Rodriguez is now vice president for thought leadership at Nationwide Financial. She oversees the company’s Nationwide Retirement Institute think tank program, advanced consulting, practice management, and training and development teams. … Here are three things Rodriguez said about LTC planning, drawn from her remarks during that visit. Few consumers, or financial advisors, jump to talk about LTC planning. … Many advisors are hungry for information about
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“Lifestyle changes improved cognition in people at risk for Alzheimer’s, study shows”

“Lifestyle changes improved cognition in people at risk for Alzheimer’s, study shows,” by Sandee LaMotte, CNN “A new study finds personalized lifestyle interventions not only stopped cognitive decline in people at risk for Alzheimer’s, but actually increased their memory and thinking skills within 18 months. … The study was published Wednesday in the journal ‘Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.’ … Evidence is growing that certain lifestyles changes such as diet, exercise and brain training might slow their mental decline, possibly even protect them from developing full-blown dementia.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform):
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“Early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline among the elderly”

“Early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline among the elderly,” by Kate Anderson, News-Medical “Early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline among the elderly, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. … The researchers discovered that there were significant negative effects of pension benefits on cognition functioning among the elderly.” LTC Comment (from Stephen A. Moses, President, Center for Long-Term Care Reform): It seems like just about everything causes dementia nowadays. But Social Security too?
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.

“Many views on aging based on misconceptions, survey finds”

“Many views on aging based on misconceptions, survey finds,” by Alicia Lasek, McKnight’s LTC News “Among the survey highlights: Nearly 40% of respondents are not aware that certain prescription medications can impact cognition, and only half know that certain medicines should be avoided as a person gets older. Most older people have multiple chronic conditions, take five-to-10 medications daily, and experience some level of disability. More than 40% mistakenly believe that it is normal for people to get depressed as they age. Few respondents are doing any activities designed to improve mobility. However, people are taking measures to prevent falls,
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Categories: Clippings, Industry News, and Long-Term Care.